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  • Sarah L Samuels

Quince Cheese

Updated: Dec 4, 2022

My neighbour gave me a bag of quince and I wasn't sure what to make with them and wasn't even sure what they tasted like.


Quince are from the same family as pears and apples but are quite bitter. They contain a lot of pectin so are perfect for jellies such as this.



I decided on Quince cheese as my husband loves cheese and biscuits and I thought this would be a good addition to the cheese board.


Quince cheese goes well with cheese, cold cooked meat and also with Sunday lunch.



Jump to recipe


Start by washing the quince thoroughly.


Then chop them into small chunks - no need to peel or core!


Place the water into a large pan and add the quince and lemon juice.



Place on a high heat and bring to the boil then reduce the heat and simmer for 2 hours.


Stir regularly to avoid the fruit sticking to the bottom of the pan - you can add more water if necessary.


The mixture will change colour and have a pinkish hue.



Once the fruit is soft push the mixture through a sieve and add the liquid purée to a large clean pan and add the sugar.



Stir on a low heat until the sugar has dissolved.



Turn up the heat to high and stir continuously for about 30 minutes.



The purée should be thickened.



Oil the containers you wish to use with a flavourless oil and fill with the hot quince cheese.


You can use any containers you want - plastic lunch boxes would work but you only want a maximum of 2cm deep.



Once cool seal the containers and you can store for up to a year.



Quince Cheese


Sarah's servings: 24

Sarah's skill: Easy


Ingredients:


2Kg Quince

2.5 Ltr Water

3 Lemons (juice of)

1.3 Kg Granulated Sugar


Method:

  1. Wash the quince thoroughly then chop them into small chunks.

  2. Place the water into a large pan and add the quince and lemon juice.

  3. Place on a high heat and bring to the boil then reduce the heat and simmer for 2 hours.

  4. Stir regularly to avoid the fruit sticking to the bottom of the pan - you can add more water if necessary.

  5. The mixture will change colour and have a pinkish hue.

  6. Once the fruit is soft push the mixture through a sieve and add the liquid purée to a large clean pan and add the sugar.

  7. Stir on a low heat until the sugar has dissolved.

  8. Turn up the heat to high and stir continuously for about 30 minutes.

  9. The purée should be thickened.

  10. Oil the containers you wish to use with a flavourless oil and fill with the hot quince cheese. You can use any containers you want - plastic lunch boxes would work but you only want a maximum of 2 cm deep.

  11. Once cool seal the containers.

  12. Store for up to a year.





Sarah's extra slice.......


You can use any containers you want - plastic lunch boxes would work but you only want a maximum of 2 cm deep.



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